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Home Boundless meetings Family and hierarchy Midgard 28: Meaningful drinking 29: Til – a Viking Age estate 30: Town-like trading centres emerged 31: Skiing Finns – the northern people 32: Ceramics from all around the world 33: Runes in everyday life 34: Surviving the winter 35: Dirty creatures or vain Norse people? 36: No moderation when dressing up 37: Only fragments and threads remain 38: House and home under lock and key 39: A wooden spoon for the soup 40: The longhouse – symbol of ownership 41: Dark – but warm and colourful 42: Demand for timber emptied the landscape 43: Food for the poor and the rich 44: Music for work, everyday life and feasts 45: Sacrifices – Viking home insurance Belief and traditions The living and the dead Divine craftwork Trading and raiding Waterways Town-like centres Christian monuments

Music for work, everyday life and feasts

The voice was the primary musical instrument of the period. The literary sources describe cult songs and Skaldic songs, poetry and verse. Singing and music were doubtless also a part of everyday life.

Melodies and dance steps which are still part of folk music in the Faroe Islands and Iceland may have already been in use in the Viking Age.

Flutes, bird whistles and horns from cows and goats were common instruments which were probably used both in social situations and for hunting and work. Individual finds of bridges and tuning pegs from bowed harps and lyres have been found in aristocratic settings. Norwegian finds suggest that mouth harps were used.

Buzz-bones, which produce a buzzing sound when they are spun with the aid of a string, were more of a toy than a musical instrument.

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Flute

  Flute

Buzzer

  Buzzer

Flute

  Flute

Lyre

  Lyre