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Home Boundless meetings Family and hierarchy Midgard 28: Meaningful drinking 29: Til – a Viking Age estate 30: Town-like trading centres emerged 31: Skiing Finns – the northern people 32: Ceramics from all around the world 33: Runes in everyday life 34: Surviving the winter 35: Dirty creatures or vain Norse people? 36: No moderation when dressing up 37: Only fragments and threads remain 38: House and home under lock and key 39: A wooden spoon for the soup 40: The longhouse – symbol of ownership 41: Dark – but warm and colourful 42: Demand for timber emptied the landscape 43: Food for the poor and the rich 44: Music for work, everyday life and feasts 45: Sacrifices – Viking home insurance Belief and traditions The living and the dead Divine craftwork Trading and raiding Waterways Town-like centres Christian monuments Svenska

Ceramics from all around the world

Everyday objects, such as ceramic vessels, can tell us about the extent of the contact network of a farmstead. Containers and urns from large parts of the then known world have been found in Scandinavia.

Many were probably originally containers for traded goods. Some of them were put to a new use as household utensils, signalling the wider network of the farmstead. Many of the vessels ended up as bone urns in burials.

In different areas and regions various types of clay were used. Also, ornamentation, surface treatment and firing varied. Analysis can, for example, show that the clay in a vessel is local, while the design and ornamentation is typical of another geographical area.

Locally manufactured vessels were often shaped and decorated to look like pots from the Vendland and Finnish-Baltic areas to the east and south of the Baltic. In other cases, the vessels were indeed made in other areas and imported.

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